Milan

Our first stop in our short tour of Northern Italy was Milan, a two hour flight from Lamezia Terme. Valeria and her new friends from Roccella had a rather wet and rainy ‘Girl’s Weekend’ in Milan first and I flew up to join her on Monday, 12th March.  We spent 3 nights in an Air B&B apartment over looking the Piazza de XXIV Maggio on the south side of town. Luckily for us I brought the sun from Roccella and we had two days of glorious weather; in contrast to Valeria’s damp weekend.   In the rain Milan has little to commend it other than shopping and Prosecco!

Milan was founded in about 600BC by a Celtic tribe and was conquered by Rome in 222BC, therafter rising in importance to become the capital of the western Roman Empire.  During the Middle Ages Milan suffered centuries of destruction and rebuilding at the hands of the Goths, Visigoths, Ostragoths and Attila the Hun.  It was conquered by the Lombards and then in the 8th century fell to Charlemagne and the Franks.

1494 -1498. Da Vinci's Last Supper. The refectory of the Dominican convent of St Maria della Grazie housing this and the ..... was completely demolished during WWII, apart from the two walls with the paintings on. (This isn't a blurred photo, the painting looks pretty fuzzy for real!)
1494 -1498. Da Vinci’s Last Supper. The refectory of the Dominican convent of St Maria della Grazie housing this and Montorfano’s Crucifiction was completely demolished during WWII, apart from the two walls with the paintings on which miraculously survived. (This isn’t a blurred photo, the painting looks pretty fuzzy for real!)
This is sometimes referred to as a Fresco, but they had to be painted quickly on wet plaster. Leonardo preferred to take his time painting on dry plaster. Frescos last far longer than dry painting on plaster and the Last Supper has been heavily restored.
Giovanni Donato da Montorfano painted his fresco, the Crucifixion, in 1495 and it is on the wall opposite the Last Supper. In the bottom corners some later figures were painted by Leonardo, but on dry plaster. The paint hasn’t lasted as well.

By the end of the 12th century Milan had become a Duchy and the conquering and destruction seems to have abated under the three Ducal families, first the Torres, followed by the Visconti and lastly the Sforza.   Our tour guide told us that the last of the Torre Dukes in Milan was imprisoned by the new Visconti family in an open air cage in Como.  They fed him bread and water for the 18 months it took him to die of exposure and malnutrition.  George Martin didn’t need to look too hard for inspiration for Game of Thrones!

Santa Maria della Grazie church from the Refectory
The Nave of the chuch of Santa Maria della Grazie

 

Vaulted ceiling in the Nave of Santa Maria della Grazie

In 1500 the French, having found the Italian city states unable to defend themselves, seized the city and heralded a period until the 19th century when control of Milan alternated between the  Spanish, French and Austrians with monotonous regularity.  In the mid 19th century the Kingdom of Sardinia backed the Milanese  against the Austrians resulting in the Sardinians gaining control over what is now Italy.  In 1861 the Kingdom of Sardinia became the Kingdom of Italy.

Sforza Castle

Milan also has the dubious honour of being the birth place, in 1919, of Facism, but was also where it ended when Partisans strung Mussolini up after the war.  The city was also a target for heavy bombing by the Allies in WWII.   Apparently the Duomo was relatively unscathed because that was the bomber’s land mark.

La Scala
Statue of Leonardo da Vinci opposite La Scala
Facade of the Prada store in the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II
Interior of the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II
Galleria from outside the Cathedral

So, after centuries of being destroyed, sacked, depopulated, rebuilt, reorganised and redeveloped there isn’t much of ‘old’ Milan left; other than the Sforza Castle and the Napoleonic Arch of Peace most of the remaining monumental buildings are religious.

Milan Cathedral. The golden statue is supposed to be higher than all othe buildings in the city to allow her to protect all those beneath her. There are now 5 taller buildings, each with their own copy of the Virgin!

We had two days to explore Milan and took a Walking Tour on Tuesday starting at the Church of Santa Maria della Grazie. housing Da Vinci’s Last Supper, and ending at the Duomo, or Milan Cathedral stopping at the Castle, La Scala Theatre and the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II on the way.   On Wednesday we walked around quite a few more of the sights and it is far easier just to show the photos.

Corso Magenta from the steps of San Maurízio Church
The interior of the pubic part of San Maurício Church. Behind this is the Cloistered Church.
The Cloistered part of San Maurício Church for the nuns.
The Cathedral is Milan’s answer to Barcelona’s Sagrada Familia, although it is now complete and with less concrete. Building started in 1386, completed in 1965.

Cathedral Nave
The Altar
The Arch was built by Napoleon as the entrance to the city along the road from Paris. It was originally called the Arc de Triomphe. However; when he was defeated the Austrians took over and changed the sculptures to look more Austrian, changed the horses positions so their backsides faced Paris and rechristened the arch the Arch of Peace!
Statue of the Emperor Constantine outside the Basilica San Lorenzo Maggiore
Bell Tower of San Maurício. Originally a tower in the Circus dating from the 3rd Century AD, and still standing.
The Circus was on the west side of the Roman town but has been completely absorbed into the later buildings apart from the tower.
Piazza di Mercantile.
The Curch of Santa Maria has what is called a ‘false apse’.  From the front there appears to be a space behind the altar..
This is a clever illusion and a change of perspective shows the back wall is flat, as can be seen when viewed from the side.

 

A piece of modern art outside the Cardorna Station. A monumental needle and thread celebrating Milan’s fashion industry.

I personally didn’t find Milan a particularly attractive city.  However; with its history that is understandable. The buildings now standing were apparently designed to be plain outside but we’re built around pretty hidden courtyards so as not to boast Milanese wealth to the various occupying powers.  There is also a vast amount of grafitti which adds to the sometimes drab, unloved appearance.

BUT, its architecture is massively impressive, and it is home to some stunning monumental architecture.  We spent an enjoyable time wandering around town and the real challenge here has been to cut down on the number of photographs I wanted to use!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *